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Archive for the ‘Pressroom’ Category

Clinton Warns of Veto on House Bill

Wednesday, July 27th, 2011
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In a letter obtained by The Washington Post, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton warned that she will urge a veto if a House Foreign Affairs committee bill that outlines severe restrictions and cuts to foreign assistance programs reaches the White House. The bill passed through the Republican-dominated committee last week, slashing payments to the United Nations and other international bodies and slapping restrictions on aid to Pakistan, Egypt and others. See below for an excerpt from the article:

In the letter, obtained from a congressional aide by The Washington Post, Clinton criticized the legislation’s “onerous restrictions” on department operations and foreign aid, and the “severe curtailing” of dues owed to international organizations — including the bill’s provision to not pay U.S. dues for the Organization of American States, the hemisphere’s main inter-governmental organization.

Clinton wrote that the bill’s ban on aid to countries that don’t meet certain anti-corruption standards “has the potential to affect a staggering number of needy aid recipients.” She also protested the “crippling restrictions on security assistance” to Egypt, Lebanon, Yemen and the Palestinian Authority.

It is not expected that this bill will pass the Senate.

MFAN Statement: Berman Amendment on Goals of U.S. Foreign Assistance Receives Bipartisan Committee Support

Friday, July 22nd, 2011
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July 22, 2011 (WASHINGTON) – This statement is delivered on behalf of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network (MFAN) by Co-Chairs David Beckmann, George Ingram and Jim Kolbe:

During yesterday’s mark-up of the FY2012 Foreign Relations Authorization Act, the House Committee on Foreign Affairs unanimously passed an amendment authored by Ranking Member Howard Berman that articulates clear goals for U.S. foreign assistance. By fostering bipartisan support for the amendment’s passage, Ranking Member Berman, Congress’ most vocal champion of foreign assistance reform, and Chairwoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen have created important momentum towards a larger goal: rewriting the Cold War-era Foreign Assistance Act of 1961. This is imperative in a world of complex and evolved challenges and tight budgets.

The original Foreign Assistance Act spelled out four clear priorities; 50 years later, that number has ballooned to more than 140 goals, mandates, and overlapping directives.  The lack of clarity and focus hinders our ability to deliver foreign assistance in a focused and strategic way, at a time when we must.

The goals drafted by Ranking Member Berman and adopted by the Committee include addressing global poverty and human suffering and promoting sustainable economic growth through trade and investment.  These echo some of the core pieces of President Obama’s Presidential Policy Directive on Global Development, which Ranking Member Berman helped shape with his work on foreign assistance reform in the last Congress. The clear building blocks for rewriting the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 are in place, and we urge Members to work together on a bipartisan basis to create modern legislation that will ensure that U.S. foreign assistance is being used more effectively and strategically to confront the global challenges of the 21st century.

 

MFAN Statement: Bipartisan Passage of Poe Amendments Creates Momentum Towards Broader Reforms

Friday, July 22nd, 2011
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July 21, 2011 (WASHINGTON) – This statement is delivered on behalf of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network (MFAN) by Co-Chairs David Beckmann, George Ingram and Jim Kolbe:

The House Foreign Affairs Committee approved two reform-focused amendments authored by Congressman Ted Poe (R-TX) during yesterday’s mark-up of the FY2012 Foreign Relations Authorization Act.  MFAN applauds the leadership of Congressman Poe in authoring these reform measures, and we also thank Chairman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL) and Ranking Member Howard Berman (D-CA) for pushing bipartisan support for the amendments, which passed the committee unanimously.

The two amendments, which would enhance transparency and monitoring and evaluation in U.S. foreign assistance programs, represent significant steps toward strengthening U.S. development efforts at a critical time:

  • The Monitoring and Evaluation amendment calls on the President to work with the leading development agencies to develop a clear and common set of guidelines to improve monitoring and evaluation programs for all U.S. foreign assistance programs.
  • The Transparency amendment also essentially codifies and expands the Administration’s new Foreign Assistance Dashboard initiative by directing the President to establish a searchable website for the publication of critical program funding and performance data for all foreign assistance programs.

The passage of the Poe amendments creates positive momentum for bipartisan congressional leadership on foreign assistance reform, and both amendments are designed to complement and improve upon the best practices and reform efforts that are underway within the Administration.

 

MFAN Statement: Foreign Relations Authorization Bill Would Roll Back Critical Reforms

Wednesday, July 20th, 2011
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Proposed Foreign Relations Authorization Bill Would Roll Back Critical Reforms

July 20, 2011 (WASHINGTON) – This statement is delivered on behalf of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network (MFAN) by Co-Chairs David Beckmann, George Ingram and Jim Kolbe:

The Fiscal Year 2012 Foreign Relations Authorization Act (H.R. 2583), which is under consideration by the House Committee on Foreign Affairs (HCFA) today, advances some useful pieces of the foreign assistance reform agenda, including prioritizing economic growth as a central goal of U.S. engagement with developing countries, fostering greater collaboration with non-government actors on development, streamlining the foreign assistance bureaucracy, and coordinating more effectively with international partners. Concrete steps in these areas would make U.S. foreign assistance more effective, at a time when increasingly complex geopolitical challenges and tight budgets demand that we get as much as possible out of every development dollar we spend.

However, we are concerned that other aspects of the legislation, particularly those having to do with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), would undermine these positive steps and turn back the unprecedented progress that has been made on reform:

  • Sec. 402: Cuts to operating expenses would make it impossible for USAID to move forward with comprehensive and long overdue internal reforms, which have already strengthened accountability and innovation at the agency.
  • Sec. 411: Stripping USAID of its budgeting capacity by defunding the agency’s Office of Budget and Resource Management would make the agency less accountable for results, not more.  The establishment of this office is a key pillar of the USAID Forward initiative and central to making USAID, and the foreign assistance it manages, more effective.

While we appreciate HCFA’s movement towards MFAN’s key goal of passing modern legislation to strengthen the effectiveness and accountability of U.S. development efforts, we urge the Committee not to cut the legs out from under USAID’s unparalleled efforts to reform itself.  Without a strong, empowered U.S. development agency, we will have one fewer tool in our foreign policy arsenal for confronting the global challenges of the 21st century.

 

MFAN STATEMENT: Obama Middle East Speech Highlights Key Elements of Foreign Assistance Reform

Monday, May 23rd, 2011
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May 20, 2010 (WASHINGTON) – This statement is delivered on behalf of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network (MFAN) by Co-Chairs David Beckmann, George Ingram, and Jim Kolbe:

We commend President Obama for launching a bold new effort to make development, particularly inclusive economic growth, a top priority for U.S. policy in the Middle East. This is critical to helping citizens of the Middle East move from poverty and protest to peace and prosperity; and another example of the strong, bipartisan commitment to elevating development as a core pillar of U.S. foreign policy, alongside diplomacy and defense.

From a foreign assistance reform perspective, the most important themes of the President’s speech included strengthening local ownership of development, building stronger civil society, providing greater representation for women and children, and increasing citizens’ capacity to hold their governments accountable. These proposed reforms echo both MFAN’s recently released policy paper, “A New Approach to U.S. Assistance in a Changing Middle East,” and our updated policy agenda.

The approach the President laid out in his speech builds on last fall’s Presidential Policy Directive on Global Development, which provided a roadmap for development to be more strategic, coordinated, and accountable across the U.S. government in the 21st Century. We urge President Obama and Congress to work together to advance the reforms laid out in the PPD and codify them in law. During a time when resources are scarce, reform is critical to making sure we get the most out of every dollar we spend on development in the Middle East and beyond.