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Archive for the ‘White House’ Category

Statement: MFAN Applauds President Obama’s Commitment to New Global Development Agenda

Tuesday, September 29th, 2015
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MFAN Applauds President Obama’s Commitment to New Global Development Agenda

September 28, 2015 (WASHINGTON) – This statement is delivered on behalf of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network (MFAN) by Co-Chairs George Ingram, Carolyn Miles, and Connie Veillette

In the first of two addresses to the United Nations General Assembly, President Obama announced the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a sweeping global development agenda to end extreme poverty and hunger. MFAN is encouraged by President Obama’s strong commitment to the 17 Sustainable Development Goals and his recognition of how integral development aid has been and will continue to be to promote democratic governance and strong institutions, decrease hunger and deaths by preventable disease, increase the number of boys and girls in schools, and lift people out of extreme poverty.

The adoption of this ambitious global agenda is a reminder of how critical accountable, locally-led development is to combatting poverty and suffering and reducing inequality around the world. MFAN is pleased to see that the President specifically mentioned the importance of using our development resources more effectively, learning from our successes and failures, and helping build the capacity of recipient countries to “do more with what they receive.”

The President’s speech endorsing the 2030 Agenda comes on the heels of the release of USAID’s Vision for Ending Extreme Poverty, the agency’s plan to accelerate progress to end extreme poverty by 2030. MFAN applauds USAID for the release of the vision document, which tackles not only why ending extreme poverty is an important development objective, but also begins to looks more tactically at how to do it. It is particularly encouraging to see the document make specific reference to the link between accountability and country ownership and how the two together “help create a world in which developing country stakeholders have the tools to make smart decisions about their own development priorities and power to implement those decisions.”

Five years after President Obama pledged to the United Nations that the United States would remain the global leader in development, MFAN is encouraged that the President and his Administration are reaffirming this commitment by backing the new 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Now that these commitments have been made, we look forward to working with the Administration as they begin to tackle the implementation of the global goals and measure its progress. As President Obama said in his remarks on Sunday, “supporting development is not charity, but is instead one of the smartest investments we can make in our own future.”


MFAN Launches “ACCOUNTdown to 2017″ Tracking Progress to Strengthen U.S. Foreign Aid

Tuesday, July 28th, 2015
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July 28, 2015 (WASHINGTON) – This statement is delivered on behalf of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network (MFAN) by Co-Chairs George Ingram, Carolyn Miles, and Connie Veillette

Today the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network is launching a new campaign, ACCOUNTdown to 2017, to track progress made toward strengthening the accountability and country ownership of U.S. foreign assistance. With ACCOUNTdown, we take stock of where Congress and the Administration are in meeting their reform commitments and the goals we laid out last year in MFAN’s The Way Forward and outline further steps that should be taken over the next 18 months to advance progress.

Bipartisan leadership over the past two decades has elevated and enhanced the ability of U.S. foreign assistance to confront threats, reduce poverty, and advance our interests. As the United States continues to face significant challenges around the world, effective foreign assistance remains as imperative as ever. Robust development policy and practice help support empowered citizens to hold their governments accountable and build local capacity to achieve sustainable results.

Over the next 18 months, we will push for and assess progress, and publicly report our findings. We urge Congress and the Administration to work together to institutionalize existing reform commitments around two critical pillars of development – accountability and country ownership.

MFAN Co-Founder Gayle Smith Nominated as Next USAID Administrator

Thursday, April 30th, 2015
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April 30, 2015 (WASHINGTON) – This statement is delivered on behalf of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network by Co-Chairs George Ingram, Carolyn Miles, and Connie Veillette:

MFAN applauds today’s announcement by the White House that Gayle Smith, Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Development and Democracy at the National Security Council, has been nominated as the next USAID Administrator. Smith, a Co-Founder of MFAN, has long been a champion of the aid effectiveness agenda while ensuring development is an equal pillar of U.S. foreign policy. In her role at the NSC, Smith has ensured development has a strong voice at the policymaking table, while helping to foster a more robust interagency dialogue and coordination around development efforts. We are pleased to see the White House nominate a strong and experienced leader to take the helm at the U.S. government’s lead development agency.

In her time at the National Security Council, Gayle Smith was instrumental in the creation of the first-ever Presidential Policy Directive on Global Development, which focused on reestablishing the U.S. as the global leader on international development by rebuilding USAID’s capacity and modernizing our approach to development. The policy directive also paved the way for USAID’s sweeping reform agenda, USAID Forward. Through this agenda, USAID has made dramatic steps in recent years to strengthen its ability to deliver results for the American people and for people in developing countries around the world. As the new USAID Administrator, we hope to see Smith maintain, if not accelerate, the momentum around implementing and institutionalizing the key reforms of the USAID Forward agenda and to ensure the continued elevation and inclusion of development alongside defense and diplomacy.

A permanent USAID Administrator is essential to sustaining strong U.S. leadership on development programs. As we cautioned in our open letter to the President earlier this month, when the Administrator position was vacant in 2009 for nearly a full year, USAID and its programs suffered. With less than two years remaining in the Obama Administration, we urge the Senate to now swiftly confirm Gayle Smith so that we can continue to advance U.S. development goals and the aid effectiveness agenda.

Building the Foundation for Self Sufficiency

Thursday, April 16th, 2015
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See below for a guest post from Andrew Wainer, Director of Policy Research at Save the Children.


This week, thousands of policymakers are meeting in Washington for the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) Spring Meetings. This year’s Spring Meetings include discussions on a vast range of issues: Recovering from the recent Ebola outbreak, global infrastructure development, and migration and remittances are just some of the topics that will be discussed.

While many focus on international foreign assistance and global finance when they think of the World Bank and IMF, this year there is a strong emphasis on domestic resource mobilization (DRM). DRM has several definitions, but one way to think about it is, “The generation of savings from [developing nations own] domestic resources and their allocation to economically and socially productive investments.” Basically it’s about developing nations’ generating their own resources to fund poverty reduction, economic growth, and other social sectors like health and education.

In fact, foreign assistance (ODA) is dwarfed by the potential resources that can be generated by developing countries themselves through raising funds through their own domestic mechanisms, including taxation.

Given the massive financing demands of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which will be  adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in September, there is now widespread consensus that ODA is not enough to eliminate poverty, and that these goals will primarily need to be reached through developing nations’ generating their own resources.

In middle-income countries, tax revenues already provide more financing than ODA. For lower-income nations to meet the SDGs, they must improve their collection and spending of domestic revenue.

Many nations have a long way to go on this front.

Half of the countries in sub-Saharan Africa collect less than 17 percent of their GDP in taxes while in upper-income countries the percentage is 35 percent.

Research by Save the Children finds that if developing nations could mobilize a minimum of 20 percent of their GDP in tax revenue it would have a major impact on reducing child deaths and contributing to countries’ health and education systems.

This prioritization of DRM in nations’ development strategies also facilitates the strengthening of a country-driven development agenda. As countries generate more of their own resources for development, they are less dependent on external funding. Liberian President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf states that many nations now seek to, “Reorient the development paradigm away from externally driven initiatives towards domestically inspired and funded initiatives.”

But the potential for nations to mobilize domestic resources is mixed, and particularly for lower developed nations, building the capacity to generate more revenue, requires initial international assistance.

In some cases, ODA and DRM can be complementary. For example, international donors can provide assistance to a developing nation’s tax gathering and administering agencies to build their revenue collection skills.

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has had an extensive program of DRM assistance in Georgia. This program focused on reducing corruption and revising its tax and customs codes. As a result of the program Georgia’s tax revenue increased.

Developing nations also need international cooperation and assistance when it comes to combatting illicit financial outflows (IFFs) which also steal potential tax revenue for potential use on poverty reduction programs and projects.  IFFs can occur through tax evasion, tax avoidance, or theft. Globally, IFFs represent as much as 4 percent of lost GDP.

Finally, donors can support advocacy efforts of local civil society to empower citizens to voice their priorities to their governments, and to hold their governments accountable for delivering results.

Happily, these issues will be front-and-center during the Spring meeting with civil society sessions on cracking down on shell companies and several World Bank and IMF sessions focused on fiscal management and tax evasion.

It may be counter-intuitive, but developing nations – both governments and civil society — need initial international assistance to build up their own revenue-generating capacity. With some international help, over the long run developing nations’ will be better able to direct and fund their own development priorities.

Broad Coalition Urges President to Nominate a Permanent USAID Administrator

Thursday, April 16th, 2015
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April 16, 2015 (WASHINGTON) – This statement is delivered on behalf of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network by Co-Chairs George Ingram, Carolyn Miles, and Connie Veillette:

Today MFAN, as part of a broad coalition of international development advocates and stakeholders, including four former USAID Administrators, is urging President Obama to expeditiously nominate a permanent Administrator to the United States Agency for International Development. Under the leadership of Administrator Rajiv Shah, USAID has made dramatic steps to strengthen its capacity to deliver results for the American people and for people in developing countries around the world.

Having a Senate-confirmed appointee at the helm of USAID is essential to advancing U.S. development goals and the aid effectiveness agenda. We are calling on the President to nominate a new Administrator as soon as possible to sustain strong U.S. leadership on the development programs that play a vital role in support of our foreign policy goals and are crucial to the lives and well-being of men and women around the globe.